Rohingya, Non-existing Existence - Cox's Bazar, Bangladesh

There is a refugee camp at Calais in France, and it was built in the 1990s during the Balkan War. Most people who lived were from Eastern Europe when it was built. After the Balkan Peninsula recovered little by little, African refugees began to settle in the camps. And as the Arab refugee crisis broke out in 2015, they also settled in this refugee camp. People compare the refugees to floods and refer to the camp as the jungle.

Those events that took place during the two World Wars are still being repeated with conflicts and wars whether they are visible or invisible, continuous or discontinuous. The only thing that has changed is that genocide has become easier with the development of weapons. In the force of destruction and explosion, the fragile human bodies are scattered in the name of refugees. We didn’t get to move forward. Not even a step.

And in Myanmar, the country of Aung San Suu Kyi, who is the symbol of resistance and democracy, the Rohingya incident took place. She was the one who shouted ‘Freedom from fear’ against the tyranny of military dictatorship and drove democracy into Myanmar. But the violence against the ethnic minorities became more severe, and even genocide was carried out. She paradoxically informed that the age of barbarians is not over.

I photographed them. The people who were forced to cross the border to escape the pressure of Myanmar. They are Rohingya. They are not welcomed even in their native country and now have become a people who do not exist anywhere.

I photographed people who do not exist.